Saturday, January 16, 2010

Muslim scholars: Seek Islamic spirit, not Islamic state

Some Muslim theologians represent an obstacle to Islamic ethics and values
The Islamic state is a controversial issue in the West, as recent news confirms.

Thursday, January 7,2010 00:30

by
Isabelle Dana Common Ground News Service

The Islamic state is a controversial issue in the West, as recent news confirms. Last October, an imam was killed and six men arrested by the FBI in Detroit for allegedly conspiring to establish an Islamic state in the United States. In the United Kingdom, government officials worry that extremist groups like Hizb-ut-Tahrir have infiltrated Muslim schools to propagate their vision of an Islamic state.

Public opinion in the West reflects the fear that radical Muslims are trying to impose their values on the rest of the world. But the nebulous term "Islamic state" is not merely a concern for the anxious Western world, it is actually a point of discord and contention within the Muslim world itself.

For many Muslim theologians, the Islamic state actually represents an obstacle to Islamic ethics and values. In Iran, pre-eminent scholar Abdulkarim Soroush, also a former political figure, emphasises how difficult it is to sustain civil, political and religious rights in the current Islamic Republic of Iran. Even the new wing of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt believes that an Islamic state is not feasible in today's world.

Increasingly, Muslim scholars across the world are calling for alternative systems that can foster an Islamic vision of society and simultaneously accommodate our increasingly pluralistic societies. They believe that pluralism and the universal democratisation of human rights are at the heart of the Qur'an. There are diverse opinions about the nature, shape and purpose of an Islamic state, ranging from the conservative to the very progressive. However, Islamic states as we know them today have largely failed in creating political systems that respect such ideas.

As a result, Mohamed Talbi, a Tunisian writer and intellectual, calls on Muslim societies to abandon the Islamic state paradigm and instead strive for a global ummah, a global community that shares the core values of freedom and justice. To him, Islam is embodied in the concept of "differences within unity", namely pluralism. He writes, "I am a Muslim atom within a human molecule. My ummah is humanity, and I do not make any distinction between confessions, opinions, colour or race; all human beings are my brothers and sisters." This time of globalisation represents to him a rare opportunity to work towards this ideal.

Farid Esack is another Muslim scholar, from South Africa, who argues against an Islamic state in today's world: if Islam's message is to fight for oppressed communities, then Islamic states as we currently know them are anything but Islamic. He came to this conclusion as a result of his personal experiences-first, as a student in Pakistan when he witnessed the persecution of poor and marginalised non-Muslim communities and, later, as an activist in South Africa, when he experienced solidarity with people from all faiths against apartheid. A close ally of former South African president Nelson Mandela, Esack also proposes a different form of Islamic influence embodied in a global ummah that does not simply tolerate differences but also unites humankind beyond race and religion for a specific purpose: justice.

Esack believes that the ummah cannot be defined by kinship but by acts of faith: the real ummah is a united inter-religious struggle against oppression in all its forms.

Abdullahi Na'im, a Sudanese Muslim intellectual who had to flee Khartoum for following the open religious doctrine of Mahmoud Taha, a Sudanese theologian and political figure who advocated political and liberal religious reform, is convinced that an Islamic state is doomed to failure and that secularism-rooted in freedom of religion, ethics and morality, and rights and duties-is by far the best system for Muslims throughout the world. This form of secularism would have to be inclusive of different worldviews and could only be built through the dialogue and exchange of a global civil society.

The importance of the ummah over the Islamic state demonstrates a shift from the state-the political apparatus-to individuals and communities who become active agents responsible for implementing Islamic ideals in their pluralistic societies. This interesting proposition, rooted in an Islamic worldview, could be a more fluid and suitable framework for our globalised world.

Wrtitten by Isabelle Dana (isabelle.dana@gmail.com) is a professional in communications and media with a focus on Africa, the Middle East and Islamic studies. This article is part of a series on Islamic law and non-Muslim minorities written for the Common Ground News Service (CGNews).

tags: The Islamic State / United Kingdom / The Muslim Brotherhood In Egypt / Muslim Scholars

Let's seeking for Islamic Spirit and Islamic State all together


by
Abu Muhammad El-Merbawiy, MY

Dear sister Isabelle Dana, The world had apprehended that how the secular states had been constructed in the west till they turned into what we called them "Western Civilization". The premier concept that was accepted among European societies was SECULARIZATION - from which Muslims in the world had precisely understood that this Nations has been built by separating religion out of worldly life.So, this civilization was applicable to those who wanted to live here in the world ONLY without any connection to world of here after. If you think that, the human civilization is for "secular people" then nothing wrong to impose Islam as you said " Islamic Spirit but not Islamic State. So why couldn't I speak aloud to the world that Israelite also has to venture in Israelite Spirit not the State of Israeli in Palestine land.Yet Israel was established within the framework of Secular State and Zionist Ideology which was nothing to relate with any kind of religion, this was understood by all people in the world. My dear sister, I sincerely ask you to understand Islam in very crystal clear. We as Muslim rejected your proposal because the religion of Islam is the religion of heaven, came to us from God - Allah almighty must be included the Spiritual aspect and the power for governing State we call it - Islamic State, because we Muslim wanted purely display to the world that Muslim won harm any body if they are going to study Islam from the right point of view, not try to study Islam from western point of view.What ever you said and argued all about, the nature of Islam that I believed must be included both way of how to construct the human civilization; from the angle of Islamic Spirit and establishing the Islamic State all together. Otherwise, ISLAM COULD NEVER BE UNDERSTOOD AS TRUE RELIGION AND COULD NEVER ESTABLISHED THE NATURE CIVILIZATION FOR ENTIRE HUMAN BEING ON THIS PLANET.

TQ DUNGUN, MALAYSIA.
Friday, January 15,2010 17:26




Why?

by

Ammatu Allah

"all human beings are my brothers and sisters" If the people who are killing your muslim brothers and assaulting your sisters in the whole world are your brothers and sisters then I am not honored that you're one of my muslim brothers. If you're a true muslim then you'll know that there are no such thing as an islamic state today,and if the real state has arised then all humanty will see nothing but justice and mercy. "Na'im is convinced that an Islamic state is doomed to failure and that secularism-rooted in freedom... "well guess what, your word is nothing compared to the word of Allah the AL-Mighty ,and inshaallah soon enough the khilafah will rise and the prejudice and injustice will come to an end.Now the question is when this happen inshaallah where you will be?and in judgement day what will you say to your lord about your failure in supporting your religion?you should prepare the answers from now!!!

Friday, January 8,2010 12:06